"

White people get so angry at the phrase, “You cannot be racist towards white people.”

I will never understand why.

Why are you so angry that you are being treated as actual human beings? You are not reduced to caricatures, but portrayed as characters. You are treated fairly, judged not by your skin tone, but by the ways that you carry yourselves, by your actions.

Why do you want to experience racism so badly? It is not fun to be mocked, dehumanized, attacked, killed, incarcerated simply for daring to exist. It is not fun to know nothing of your history or family because it was torn apart, whether through distance or death. It is not fun to hear, at every turn, comments reminding you of your lesser status as humans.

Do you really want to turn on the tv, open a magazine, watch a movie, play a video game, and not see yourself? Or, even better, to only see yourself as a criminal, as a drunk, a mocking stereotype, or as someone to be killed off? Or would you rather see fleshed out, well-written characters with lives and personalities and feelings? I know which I’d rather pick.

If I were a white person, the phrase, “You cannot be racist towards white people,” would be the best thing I could ever hear.

"

— i finally put some thoughts into words // thedeathcats (via taint3ed)

(via afro-dominicano)

"Codependency isn’t sexy. It isn’t romantic. It’s built with a fuse and will surely burn out. The healthiest thing you can say to the one you love is, “I would be okay without you, and that’s why I choose to stay.”"

LB, A Few Things About Love (via dangervvank)

(via polyamorouslife)

nitaohoyo:

I was workin on another project, but was commissioned yesterday to bead another medallion for a vet. This is where I’m at now with it. I’m starting to really like it with the black and white/silver. #choctaw #chahta #choctawpride #ndn #beadwork #choctawveterans #veterans #vets #origami #crafts #craftwork #comission #wopilatunkashila (at Tulalip Indian Reservation)

it looks so great!! 

nitaohoyo:

I was workin on another project, but was commissioned yesterday to bead another medallion for a vet. This is where I’m at now with it. I’m starting to really like it with the black and white/silver. #choctaw #chahta #choctawpride #ndn #beadwork #choctawveterans #veterans #vets #origami #crafts #craftwork #comission #wopilatunkashila (at Tulalip Indian Reservation)

it looks so great!! 

postracialcomments:

The young lady that was shot in the head by a police officer is still waiting to be interviewed by the police department
Ferguson Police claimed that 4 to 5 Black males conducted a drive by which resulted in a White woman being shot in the head. (Here, Here, Here)
(they’ve edited the articles to take out the white part and that she was killed hehehe)
Residents knew it was BS. 
Turns out Mya was shot by a police officer. The department forced surgeons to take the bullet out and took the bullet for “Ballistics”
Over a week later, she still has yet to be contacted by the department
Do not let her story go ignored

postracialcomments:

The young lady that was shot in the head by a police officer is still waiting to be interviewed by the police department

Ferguson Police claimed that 4 to 5 Black males conducted a drive by which resulted in a White woman being shot in the head. (Here, Here, Here)

(they’ve edited the articles to take out the white part and that she was killed hehehe)

Residents knew it was BS. 

Turns out Mya was shot by a police officer. The department forced surgeons to take the bullet out and took the bullet for “Ballistics”

Over a week later, she still has yet to be contacted by the department

Do not let her story go ignored

(via fyeahcracker)

lovelyandbrown:

thisiseverydayracism:

The prison-industrial complex is just a myth…right?

Jesus he didn’t even have us do the damn math. He just said it.

lovelyandbrown:

thisiseverydayracism:

The prison-industrial complex is just a myth…right?

Jesus he didn’t even have us do the damn math. He just said it.

(via youngblackandvegan)

18mr:

If you’re like us, you’re asking what you can do for #Ferguson. Pakou Her, our Campaign Director, writes: 
The answer is this: As Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, Ferguson is a call to action and solidarity. While our experiences with racism are not the same as the trauma of racism lived by Black people, there are plenty of reasons to be enraged about the damage being wrought by systemic oppression. If we as AAPIs fail to act, if we remain silent and choose to fill the shoes of the “model minority,” we have chosen the side of oppression.
Today, you and I can choose to disrupt the status quo and demand justice for Michael Brown – and it doesn’t require living in Ferguson or even traveling there. Here are three things you can do right now:
DONATE to the Michael Brown Memorial Fund. The funds collected through the fund will be used by the Brown family to cover funeral and burial expenses, as well as travel and living expenses for Michael’s parents as they pursue justice for their son.
SUPPORT grassroots groups and cultural media outlets that are reporting in real time from the ground in Ferguson. You can honor the leadership of young Black organizers by following the Million Hoodies Movement for Justice – follow them on Twitter, and like them on Facebook.
SIGN this petition by Color of Change calling on the Department of Justice to issue a thorough investigation of anti-Black police brutality and excessive use of force by the Ferguson Police Department. 
At this very moment, the situation in Ferguson is growing increasingly worse. Community organizers, journalists, and residents are facing brutal assaults on their safety and civil rights at the hands of a militarized police force; officers in tanks and clad in riot gear are firing rubber coated bullets and smoke grenades into crowds of peaceful protesters; and the police have turned to raiding churches and safe zones where protestors are storing the materials they need to treat those who are teargassed and otherwise injured.
AAPIs cannot stand on the sidelines. As Soya Jung, Senior Partner at ChangeLab says, “… Asian Americans often end up somewhere in the chasm between blackness and whiteness – whether pushed there, largely invisible and struggling to dodge the crossfire, or diving in to eagerly reap the rewards of non-blackness. Our options are invisibility, complicity, or resistance, and black rage is a clarion call for standing on the correct side of the color line, for reaping the collective rewards of justice … I choose resistance.”
Let’s channel our sorrow and immobility into power and action. Let’s step into solidarity to fight for the humanity and civil rights of Black people and communities. Let’s be the change we want to see in the world.
(The illustration is of a print created in response to the killing of Michael Brown by Mary Engelbreit, a renowned artist and St. Louis resident. You can purchase a copy of the print here. All proceeds from print sales will go directly to the Michael Brown Memorial Fund.)

18mr:

If you’re like us, you’re asking what you can do for #Ferguson. Pakou Her, our Campaign Director, writes: 

The answer is this: As Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, Ferguson is a call to action and solidarity. While our experiences with racism are not the same as the trauma of racism lived by Black people, there are plenty of reasons to be enraged about the damage being wrought by systemic oppression. If we as AAPIs fail to act, if we remain silent and choose to fill the shoes of the “model minority,” we have chosen the side of oppression.

Today, you and I can choose to disrupt the status quo and demand justice for Michael Brown – and it doesn’t require living in Ferguson or even traveling there. Here are three things you can do right now:

  1. DONATE to the Michael Brown Memorial Fund. The funds collected through the fund will be used by the Brown family to cover funeral and burial expenses, as well as travel and living expenses for Michael’s parents as they pursue justice for their son.
  2. SUPPORT grassroots groups and cultural media outlets that are reporting in real time from the ground in Ferguson. You can honor the leadership of young Black organizers by following the Million Hoodies Movement for Justice – follow them on Twitter, and like them on Facebook.
  3. SIGN this petition by Color of Change calling on the Department of Justice to issue a thorough investigation of anti-Black police brutality and excessive use of force by the Ferguson Police Department. 

At this very moment, the situation in Ferguson is growing increasingly worse. Community organizers, journalists, and residents are facing brutal assaults on their safety and civil rights at the hands of a militarized police force; officers in tanks and clad in riot gear are firing rubber coated bullets and smoke grenades into crowds of peaceful protesters; and the police have turned to raiding churches and safe zones where protestors are storing the materials they need to treat those who are teargassed and otherwise injured.

AAPIs cannot stand on the sidelines. As Soya Jung, Senior Partner at ChangeLab says, “… Asian Americans often end up somewhere in the chasm between blackness and whiteness – whether pushed there, largely invisible and struggling to dodge the crossfire, or diving in to eagerly reap the rewards of non-blackness. Our options are invisibility, complicity, or resistance, and black rage is a clarion call for standing on the correct side of the color line, for reaping the collective rewards of justice … I choose resistance.”

Let’s channel our sorrow and immobility into power and action. Let’s step into solidarity to fight for the humanity and civil rights of Black people and communities. Let’s be the change we want to see in the world.

(The illustration is of a print created in response to the killing of Michael Brown by Mary Engelbreit, a renowned artist and St. Louis resident. You can purchase a copy of the print here. All proceeds from print sales will go directly to the Michael Brown Memorial Fund.)

(via weareallmixedup)

nicocoer:

madeofpatterns:

into-the-weeds:

Independence is precious

This is a VERY INTENSE 1-minute video, and it needs a domestic violence tw. If you do watch it, it’s a powerful ode to independence, dignity of risk, and the fact that the lives of women with intellectual and developmental disabilities should reside at the heart of feminism. Self determination, autonomy, bodily sovereignty. These things matter for everyone.

(I want to add a caveat about even very direct support being possible to give and receive in a respectful, self-directed way, and that independence includes directing your supports, but I don’t think the movie argues against that at all, it’s just a misconception I could see forming.)

I don’t understand what happens in this video. Can someone explain it to me?

The first part is (presumably) a woman without a disability, who looks to be about 30, who is manually helped with every task in her life. She is not allowed to independently talk on the phone to the office (Bureau, could be interpreted as her workplace or as a social services office), to prepare her own food, fill out her forms how she would like, drink coffee without help, or even brush her teeth. This is shown by a masculine hand doing each of these tasks “for” her in a physically invasive manner. Her affect grows frustrated and sad (I think?) by the end of the video. During the paperwork scene you could interpret her as bored.

There are a lot of cultural codings in this.

This for many people replicates the feeling of an abusive relationship where the abuser controls every aspect of the person they are abusing’s life. This technique is one used in order to isolate and induce feelings of worthlessness and neediness in the person who is target of the abuse, so that they will not report or leave the abuser.

The being overly helpful part in particular makes the person feel as though if they were to tell anyone how it makes them feel, that it might be brushed aside. In fact, complaining about someone helping you in an MH treatment setting can get you a Borderline Personality Disorder DX, especially if you have other behaviors- sadly, many of those other behaviors are ones that are ALSO common in people living in abusive situations long term. 

Because of the level of “helpfulness” involved, it can also make articulating the potentially abusive nature of the abuser’s activities hard. Sometimes it can be hard to explain how someone “helping” you in the kitchen is bad or harmful, or how someone “helping” you with papers is harmful. It can be difficult to have the wherewithal and language to describe, in detail, exactly how much this is done and how it is used to disempower you. (I was abused in a way that was much more explicit than this, but it took me a decade to be able to articulate why it was abusive; this kind of abuse would be even harder to talk about why it is abuse.) 

The second part of the video shows a young woman with down syndrome. It is on the same kitchen set as the above scenario, but she is alone filling out a worksheet. It gives her name and an age of 30. Additionally she has similar coloring to the woman in the initial scenario. In this case, though, the masculine “help” is not present, and it tells us that she is successfully living independently in her community. 

Here it makes a connection between how the viewer presumably felt negative about the level of unneeded support the non-disabled actress had, and the way that many people act when supporting people with intellectual disabilities.

It implies that often people over estimates the level of assistance a person needs, or acts in an overly protective manner when adulthood activities (preparing food, taking responsibility of personal hygiene, dealing with office calls, etc) come up. This can feel uncomfortable, invasive, and so on when there aren’t opportunities to safely self direct or to take responsibility at the level that the individual decides.  Many people don’t make this connection if shown a person with disabilities receiving “help,” instead assuming that if the person is being given that level of “help” that they must need it.

The goal is to promote the possibility of independent living for people with intellectual disabilities. This would be rather than insisting someone has to choose between living with their parents or a group home, or even just round the clock care if they don’t need that level of support.

It also allows people the option of considering how they view people with ID- it makes them able to think about how they react when they see someone upset about the help they get. Sometimes people assume the upset that is actually about a lack of control in a person’s life is actually just another part of their disability.

But this shows them someone without a disability having those same exact responses they might have seen from someone. Because it waits until the viewer would be uncomfortable with the actress being treated that way gets them emotionally invested before the subject of disabilitity is broached, it can be an “oh” moment. They haven’t been allowed to brush it off by contextualizing it as “they are disabled, that must be the problem.” 

So it really is doing a lot of things in a non-explicit fashion. It is using a lot of knowledge we have about how people think that is used in marketing.

Weed’s comment about someone trying to dismiss/misunderstand it as being against personal care when it isn’t is very important in light of all it is doing. After you (not you as in you, patterns, but you as in whoever is reading this) read my blurb here, I suggest scrolling back up to reread weed’s comments. 

(via reclaimingthelatinatag)

bogleech:

Hey when people say “fuck white people” please keep in mind that those are just words on the internet while actual, real white cops are really murdering black kids and now terrorizing an entire town of innocent civilians. People are being shot and arrested for the crime of being brown while outside and you’re mad because someone angrily “generalized” in a blog post boohoohoo reverse raecesms wehhhhhhhhhhhh

get over it

get. over it.

(via thedrunkenenigma)

ecklecticsoul:

{Strolling Series by Cecile Emeke}

Sexism,Patriarchy,Racism and Colonialsm.Full Discourse

(via afro-dominicano)

enchanted-dystopia:

rafi-dangelo:

We’re not people really.  Our concerns are not America’s concerns.  We are just here for entertainment. We’re a convenient treasure trove of limitless creativity to be pillaged, watered down, and re-purposed for White audiences and the people getting rich from bastardized stereotypes and simplified caricatures of everything we bring to the table have nothing to say when shit gets really real.

THAT’S WHY YOU DON’T FUCKING EVER TALK TO ME ABOUT MILEY, OR IGGY, OR FUCKING MACKLEMORE.

(via the-wistful-collectivist)

whatazendra:

Just let this sink in for a bit. #ferguson

whatazendra:

Just let this sink in for a bit. #ferguson

(via youngblackandvegan)

daughtersofdig:

Meet The Generation Of Incredible Native American Women Fighting To Preserve Their Culture by Danielle Seewalker for Marie Claire UK

Native Americans represent just one per cent of the US population and some languages have only one speaker left. Now a new generation is fighting to preserve the culture.

Meet the women leading that fight: http://www.marieclaire.co.uk/blogs/547176/meet-the-generation-of-incredible-native-american-women-fighting-to-preserve-their-culture.html#y5UioxWL1hQHhom1.01

(via memoriat)

Anonymous said: what do u think about nicki skinny shaming in anaconda?

youngblackandvegan:

prayistrash:

I think skinny ppl can turn off her song and open literally any magazine, watch any other video or movie and tv show and see their body types idealized and praised

not to condone 

but to just put the criticism of anaconda in perspective

Tags: truth

allycoalition:

A really simple way to create a safe space. Spotted at Center on Halsted, partners of our friends #globalact last week in Chicago

allycoalition:

A really simple way to create a safe space. Spotted at Center on Halsted, partners of our friends #globalact last week in Chicago

dynastylnoire:

lovelyandbrown:

mylifeinthelibrary:

It really warms my heart to see the library looking out for its community in the light of everything happening in Ferguson.

(Source 1, 2)

EDIT: Be sure to follow Ferguson Library on twitter.

!!!

BOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOST

(via afro-dominicano)